Saturday, 14 March 2020

The Coronavirus Crisis Has Showed Us How Truly Horrible and Selfish People Can Be

While people worry and try to stay safe amid a fast-growing coronavirus crisis, there are plenty of jerks out there looking to profit from it. People aren't really stockpiling toilet paper and hand sanitizer for decades, they're doing it to make a profit.

Just take a look at these two people in Vancouver, B.C.  who just have to do it to survive and so that they can send their kids to private schools costing $20,000 per year. Poor them. These developers who supposedly would be making pretty good salaries somewhere are in danger of running low on money. So obviously, buying $100,000 worth of sanitary products and then re-selling them at inflated prices is the answer. Nothing like screwing over a person who actually, genuinely, needs it.

In one of the most disgusting examples of opportunism, people like Manny Range and Violeta Perez are willing to buy $20 wipes at Costco and then re-sell them for four times the price online, maybe more.

 The one good thing about this story—Amazon didn't allow these scumbags to use its platform to exploit the coronavirus crisis for profit. The company disabled their account and told the CBC that "There is no place for price gouging on Amazon." It's a great example of what a company should do and Amazon is doing a great job of setting the bar. The company's also helping to make coronavirus test kits available for people in Seattle, an area that's been among the hardest hit by COVID-19 in the U.S.

One company that isn't doing its part in the coronavirus crisis—Costco

Costco is an example of a company that's falling well short of its ethical duties here. It's allowing people to load up on supplies in quantities that just aren't justifiable. Unless people are planning to stay locked in their homes for years, they would never need so much toilet paper. And even then—what's left to excrete when you have far more toilet paper than you have food?

The selfishness is appalling:

It wouldn't be difficult for Costco to impose a customer or family limit yet the company doesn't seem to care that it's making the situation worse, not better. They're enabling irrational panic buying and allowing scumbags to profit from the coronavirus crisis in the process. It's led to some looking to Google find ways to try and make their own hand sanitizer:


Important side note—who still doesn't know how to take a screenshot in 2020?

Buying necessities and then gouging people later is not a 'business'

A pitiful argument I've seen in favor of this type of behvaior is that it's okay to do because it's just being smart, no different than running a business. False. Taking advantage of people doesn't make you a shrewd business person. Businesses, at least most of them, exhibit some sort of ethics and they also pay taxes—something these opportunists will probably try to skirt as well. We've already got a glimpse of some of their wonderful behavior already. 

Call it for what it is: people taking advantage of other people. It's one thing to obtain a broken item, fix it, add value, and then sell it for a higher price later. Value's been added along that process. Here, this is only an example of greed and selfishness. Essentials like toilet paper aren't things people can just forgo, and creating a shortage only exacerbates the dire situation that the coronavirus has created.

Half empty bottom line: Buy what you need and have a conscience when you do. Buying in excess means taking away from someone else who may have little recourse but to buy at grossly marked up prices.